Broken Puppy Blog

On Wednesday, August 26, I found this puppy (approx. eight months old) in the road with two broken legs. She is a wonderful animal and we are raising funds to cover the costs of surgery and rehab. Keep checking back for updates on her progress.

My wife Rebecca and I are musicians living in North Carolina. We have an awesome rescue dog named Domino (pictured above). Rebecca is a volunteer at the local humane society. From the Broken Puppy and all of us, thank you for your kindness!

― Scott MacLeod

UPDATE: Due to the tremendous response to Hope's struggles, we now feel that her medical expenses will be covered. We will not know the exact tally of costs associated with her rehabilitation until late November, but all estimates indicate that her needs have been met. Our gratitude for all who gave to her cause cannot be adequately expressed.

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Click here to follow Hope's story from the beginning.
This is my last post on BrokenPuppy.  The blog has served its purpose;  first, it was a forum for news and donations, in that terribly critical  week after I found Hope in the road.  Second, it allowed me to tell  Hope’s remarkable story and share pictures with the many friends that  Hope made along her journey.  If you are a new visitor, please start at  the beginning and read this blog in reverse (chronological) order for  the full story and pictures, or read the summary below.   To recap: on August 26, 2009, I was driving home from a new job in  Pembroke (NC) when I saw a dog in the middle of an intersection.  She  looked panicked and confused, but I didn’t realize she was hurt until I  got out of my car to try to “shoo” her off to the side - she hobbled two  steps and lied down.  With the help of a passer-by I pulled her out of  the road, then went to the closest house and asked if anyone recognized  this dog.  The woman who lived there gave me sheets and water, but  didn’t know who the dog belonged to.   I typed “vet” into my GPS and contacted the closest listing.  On the way  over, I patted this dog and talked to her.  She was lying in the  passenger seat, scared but incredibly trusting.  She was covered in  fleas and ticks (three kinds of worms too, I later learned).  She  “asked” me to help her.  I promised her I would.   The veterinarian was out treating livestock, so his son helped stabilize  the dog and promised that his Father would assess her and call as soon  as he returned.  I left the dog off, thinking that this was the end of  the tale, that she would get the help she needed.  It was getting dark  and I still had a two-hour drive home.     Around 8:00 that night the vet called.  He told me that the dog was  around eight months old and had two broken rear legs.  The legs were in  such bad shape that he recommended euthanasia.  Not wanting to serve  execution orders for a dog I had tried so hard to save, nor reneg on my  promise to her, I questioned whether anything could be done to give her a  normal life again.  His hesitation was all the motivation I needed to  get a second opinion.  I asked him to monitor her over the night, and if  she survived I would be in touch in the morning.   My new colleague Valerie Austin, a fellow dog-lover, transported the dog  to a new vet the next day.  Dr. Curt Locklear at the Southeastern  Veterinary Hospital assessed her and decided that she could be saved,  though it would not be easy.  He advised that she needed a specialist,  and it would be expensive.  Rebecca and I began calling rescue  organizations and shelters, anyone who may help this creature.  Many did  not want to get involved.  A few gave us friendly advice but could not  handle her complex situation.  The Guilford County Animal Shelter was  willing to take her in and give her treatment, but we would have to  surrender her and would not be able to follow her progress.  For a whole  day we made phone calls and researched possibilities.  The only  specialists we could find who would take on her situation gave us an  estimated price tag of $4000.  As the evening hours passed we were sad  and discouraged.  Then got a call from a California-based rescue  organization (United Animal Nations) who pledged a grant toward  her hospital bills.  My good friend Brandon Bautista, a webdesigner in  Michigan, suggested we start a blog and ask for help in fundraising.   Thus, the BrokenPuppy blog was formed.   I sent out emails to my closest friends and established a cause on  facebook.  News of this puppy’s struggle circulated and donations came  pouring in.  Over the weekend we had over 1500 hits from eight different  countries and raised more than half of her estimated expenses.  The  momentum kept increasing, and by September third I was able to shut down  the paypal site, having raised the full amount.  Friends and strangers  alike were linking this story to their blogs, joining the facebook  cause, even contacting news organizations.  The response was surprising  and overwhelming.  She had her surgery, and despite the naysayers (and  there were more than a few) it seemed possible that she would really be  able to walk again.  We named her Hope and spent the next six weeks  rehabilitating her in our home.   Hope not only regained the ability to walk, she healed to the point  where she can run and play like a normal dog.  And though our original  intention was to rehabilitate her and adopt her out, this dog became  such a beloved part of our household that we decided she would become  part of our family.  She is one of the kindest creatures I have ever  encountered, and not a day goes by that I am not thankful for the happy  ending to this story.  Rebecca and I are eternally indebted to all who  helped save Hope, and honored to have been a part of such an emotional  and inspiring saga. 

This is my last post on BrokenPuppy.  The blog has served its purpose; first, it was a forum for news and donations, in that terribly critical week after I found Hope in the road.  Second, it allowed me to tell Hope’s remarkable story and share pictures with the many friends that Hope made along her journey.  If you are a new visitor, please start at the beginning and read this blog in reverse (chronological) order for the full story and pictures, or read the summary below.
 
To recap: on August 26, 2009, I was driving home from a new job in Pembroke (NC) when I saw a dog in the middle of an intersection.  She looked panicked and confused, but I didn’t realize she was hurt until I got out of my car to try to “shoo” her off to the side - she hobbled two steps and lied down.  With the help of a passer-by I pulled her out of the road, then went to the closest house and asked if anyone recognized this dog.  The woman who lived there gave me sheets and water, but didn’t know who the dog belonged to.
 
I typed “vet” into my GPS and contacted the closest listing.  On the way over, I patted this dog and talked to her.  She was lying in the passenger seat, scared but incredibly trusting.  She was covered in fleas and ticks (three kinds of worms too, I later learned).  She “asked” me to help her.  I promised her I would.
 
The veterinarian was out treating livestock, so his son helped stabilize the dog and promised that his Father would assess her and call as soon as he returned.  I left the dog off, thinking that this was the end of the tale, that she would get the help she needed.  It was getting dark and I still had a two-hour drive home. 
 
Around 8:00 that night the vet called.  He told me that the dog was around eight months old and had two broken rear legs.  The legs were in such bad shape that he recommended euthanasia.  Not wanting to serve execution orders for a dog I had tried so hard to save, nor reneg on my promise to her, I questioned whether anything could be done to give her a normal life again.  His hesitation was all the motivation I needed to get a second opinion.  I asked him to monitor her over the night, and if she survived I would be in touch in the morning.
 
My new colleague Valerie Austin, a fellow dog-lover, transported the dog to a new vet the next day.  Dr. Curt Locklear at the Southeastern Veterinary Hospital assessed her and decided that she could be saved, though it would not be easy.  He advised that she needed a specialist, and it would be expensive.  Rebecca and I began calling rescue organizations and shelters, anyone who may help this creature.  Many did not want to get involved.  A few gave us friendly advice but could not handle her complex situation.  The Guilford County Animal Shelter was willing to take her in and give her treatment, but we would have to surrender her and would not be able to follow her progress.  For a whole day we made phone calls and researched possibilities.  The only specialists we could find who would take on her situation gave us an estimated price tag of $4000.  As the evening hours passed we were sad and discouraged.  Then got a call from a California-based rescue organization (United Animal Nations) who pledged a grant toward her hospital bills.  My good friend Brandon Bautista, a webdesigner in Michigan, suggested we start a blog and ask for help in fundraising.  Thus, the BrokenPuppy blog was formed.
 
I sent out emails to my closest friends and established a cause on facebook.  News of this puppy’s struggle circulated and donations came pouring in.  Over the weekend we had over 1500 hits from eight different countries and raised more than half of her estimated expenses.  The momentum kept increasing, and by September third I was able to shut down the paypal site, having raised the full amount.  Friends and strangers alike were linking this story to their blogs, joining the facebook cause, even contacting news organizations.  The response was surprising and overwhelming.  She had her surgery, and despite the naysayers (and there were more than a few) it seemed possible that she would really be able to walk again.  We named her Hope and spent the next six weeks rehabilitating her in our home.
 
Hope not only regained the ability to walk, she healed to the point where she can run and play like a normal dog.  And though our original intention was to rehabilitate her and adopt her out, this dog became such a beloved part of our household that we decided she would become part of our family.  She is one of the kindest creatures I have ever encountered, and not a day goes by that I am not thankful for the happy ending to this story.  Rebecca and I are eternally indebted to all who helped save Hope, and honored to have been a part of such an emotional and inspiring saga. 

Comments

Greensboro residents have no doubt heard about the recent acquisition of 97 dogs from a local kennel. Many of these dogs were malnourished and disease-ridden when they were seized. They now reside at the Guilford County Animal Shelter and will likely be candidates for adoption, but the shelter is strapped for resources and not equipped for this sudden increase in numbers. This is a sad situation and many have been concerned about the welfare of these animals and the financial burden the shelter now faces. But there is a silver lining - Ellen Degeneres and her pet care company have stepped up and donated 5,000 meals for these poor dogs:

http://www.news-record.com/content/2010/04/17/article/actress_ellen_degeneres_to_donate_meals_to_guilford_county_animal_shelter.

Ellen is a talented and funny actress, and also a great human being. Very cool.

Comments

Kadee (Arty) got adopted from the local shelter. Rebecca had been visiting her regularly as a shelter volunteer, and was relieved to find out yesterday that she went home with a nice family. We hope that this will be beginning of a new, happier part of this gentle dog’s life.

Comments

Hope caused a bit of drama over the weekend by getting into some birdseed. Because birdseed can be poisonous and/or cause intestinal obstruction, we had to take her to the vet and induce vomiting. She defecated birdseed for the next 48 hours. She’s doing fine now, I’m glad we caught her in the act.

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A fictionalized account of Hope’s saga is included in Patricia Stanley’s “Shelter Stories From the Dog Adoption Ward,” a colorful collection of short stories on sale at the Tallahassee Animal Shelter. Hope’s story is called “On an Ordinary Day,” and though many liberties are taken, the fundamental pieces of her story are intact and sensitively retold. More information is available at www.pstanleybooks.com - all proceeds from sales will be applied to renovation of the TAS dog runs. Thanks to Patricia for including Hope in her writings and sharing a copy of her book with us.

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Domino and Hope are having a fun vacation at the beach.

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Tomorrow will mark six months since rescuing Hope. She has been the source of much inspiration, education, and affection. As far as I can tell, her legs are completely healed and have had no further complications - we go on weekly runs, she doesn’t seem to have any pain or hesitation. To those of you who donated to her surgery six months ago, thank you, thank you, thank you. I think the picture above says this better than my words ever could.

Tomorrow will mark six months since rescuing Hope. She has been the source of much inspiration, education, and affection. As far as I can tell, her legs are completely healed and have had no further complications - we go on weekly runs, she doesn’t seem to have any pain or hesitation. To those of you who donated to her surgery six months ago, thank you, thank you, thank you. I think the picture above says this better than my words ever could.

Comments

I enjoyed reading about Treo, the black lab who won the Dickin Medal for military heroics. Sometimes our canine friends are truly inspiring: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8533382.stm

Comments